State of the Salmon

Ecological Interactions between Wild & Hatchery Salmon

May 4–7, 2010 • Hilton Hotel • Portland, Oregon


Presentations

 

Wednesday, May 5

1. Ecological interactions across habitats and life histories

Barry Berejikian, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Introduction

1A. Ecological interactions across habitats and life histories: Part I

Juvenile salmon and smolts in freshwater

Jim Winton, USGS
Disease risks posed by hatchery salmon

Seth Naman, NOAA Southwest Region, Protected Resources
Predation by juvenile hatchery salmonids on natural produced salmonids in the freshwater
environment: A review of studies, two case histories, and implications for management

Eric Buhle, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Unintended consequences of supplementation: Impact of hatcheries on salmon population
dynamics

Chris Tatara, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Evidence of and factors affecting competition between wild and hatchery anadromous
salmonids in freshwater

1B. Ecological interactions across habitats and life histories: Part II

Post-smolts in the estuarine/coastal shelf environments

Dan Bottom, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Hatchery influence on the estuarine life histories of juvenile salmon

Elizabeth Daly, Oregon State University
Spatial overlap and potential competitive trophic interactions of marked and unmarked
Chinook salmon during early marine residence in the California Current

Sub-adults on the high seas

Greg Ruggerone, Natural Resources Consultants, Inc.
Evidence for competition between salmon at sea

Masahide Kaeriyama, Hokkaido University
Ecological interactions across habitats and life histories of Pacific salmon in the North
Pacific

1C. Ecological interactions across habitats and life histories: Part III

Adults migrating and spawning from coast to spawning grounds

Mark Scheuerell, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Evaluating large-scale effects of hatchery supplementation on threatened spring/summer
Chinook salmon from the Snake River basin, USA

Andrew Dittman, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Spatial and temporal overlap of hatchery and wild spring Chinook salmon spawning: effects
of hatchery acclimation sites

Steve Schroder, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
The reproductive behavior and breeding success of hatchery and wild spring Chinook
salmon spawning in an artificial stream

Rich Brenner, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Hatchery pink and chum salmon straying into Prince William Sound and southeast Alaska
streams

THURSDAY, MAY 6

2. Human responses to hatcheries: Understanding the social, cultural, legal, and
economic dimensions

Susan Hanna, Oregon State University
Coevolution of hatcheries, economics, property rights and management

Chris Carter, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (retired)
Economic analysis of a Columbia River fish hatchery program

Mitsuhiro Nagata, Hokkaido Fish Hatchery
Conservation principles of naturally spawning salmonids in Hokkaido, Japan

David Close, University of British Columbia
Fish without a story

Vladimir Samarskiy, SakhalinRybvod
Wild and hatchery reproduction of Pacific salmonids in Sakhalin region

John Burke, Southern Southeast Regional Aquaculture Association
Alaska salmon enhancement: The economic impact of the Southern Southeast Region
Aquaculture Program

3. Pacific Rim highlights: Moving from theory to practice

Examples from a diversity of salmon ecoregions around the North Pacific focused on predicting, minimizing, and adaptively managing risks associated with ecological interactions between wild and hatchery salmon

Mel Sheng, Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Salmon Enhancement Program
An Overview of Coho and Chinook Hatchery Facilities in the Strait of Georgia (SoGSalish
Sea)

Karl English, LGL
Skeena Independent Science Review Panel -- Overview

Alexander Kaev, SakhNIRO
Significance of hatchery pink and chum salmon for the Sakhalin region fishery

Eric Volk, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Balancing benefits and risks of large scale hatchery salmon production in Alaska

4A. Columbia River: Moving from theory to practice Part I, risk assessment

Examples from the Columbia River focused on predicting, minimizing, and adaptively
managing risk of ecological interactions between wild and hatchery salmon

Todd Pearsons, Grant County Public Utility District
Ecological Risk Assessment of multiple hatchery programs in the upper Columbia
Watershed using a Delphi approach

Craig Busack, NOAA Salmon Recovery Division
PCD Risk 1, a model for assessing and reducing the ecological risk of salmonid hatchery
operations in freshwater

Kyle Brakensiek, independent consultant
Ecological risks to natural populations of Chinook salmon by hatchery releases of Chinook
and coho salmon throughout the greater Puget Sound region, Washington: A PCD Risk 1
assessment

Barry Berejikian, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Natural growth regimes for hatchery-reared steelhead to reduce residualism and negative ecological interactions

5A. Regional breakout sessions: Knowledge and management gaps in wild-hatchery
salmon interactions

Meetings of scientists, managers and stakeholders organized prior to the
conference; observers are welcome to attend (space permitting)

Alaska and North Coast British Columbia

William Heard, NOAA Fisheries
An overview of salmon stock enhancement in Southeast Alaska

Steve Moffitt, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Prince William Sound hatchery pink salmon straying: A preliminary model

Matthew Foy, Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Salmon Enhancement
Program
A brief summary of salmon enhancement programs in north coastal British Columbia,
Canada

Karl English, LGL
Skeena Independent Science Review Panel - Assessing tradeoffs between biodiversity and
harvest yield using data from the Skeena River

Russian Far East/Western Pacific

Syuiti Abe, Hokkaido University
Genetic diversity, population structure and phylogeography of Pacific salmon inferred from
molecular genetic analyses

Yasuyuki Miyakoshi, Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Research Institute
Current status of wild and hatchery chum salmon in Hokkaido

Hirokazu Urabe, Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Research Institute
Conservation and enhancement of masu salmon in Hokkaido, Japan

Lev Zhivotovsky, Institute of General Genetics
Gene flow between hatchery and wild salmon populations

Oleg Zaporozhets, KamchatNIRO
Some ecological consequences of hatchery reproduction of Pacific salmon in Kamchatka

Victor Markovtsev, TINRO
Hatchery effects on wild salmon

Sergei Zolotukhin, TINRO
Wild-hatchery management of Khabarovsk fall chum salmon from 1907-2009

West Coast North America Estuarine and Shelf Ecosystems

Laurie Weitkamp, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Potential interactions between juvenile salmon in West Coast shelf and estuarine waters

4B. Columbia River: Moving from theory to practice Part II, risk minimization and
adaptive management

Kathryn Kostow, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Strategies for mitigating ecological effects of hatchery programs: Some case studies from
the Pacific Northwest

Jerri Bartholomew, Oregon State University
Reducing disease risks caused by pathogens associated with Columbia River hatcheries

Greg Blair, ICF International
An analysis of potential cumulative ecological interactions of hatchery programs in the
lower Columbia Rive
r

Gabriel Temple, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Risk management of non-target fish taxa in the Yakima River Watershed associated with
hatchery salmon supplementation

 

About the Conference
   • Organizing Committee
   • Presentations
   • Press
   • Sponsors


Downloads

Program
(4.5mb pdf)

Program
Japanese - 日本語 (7.65mb pdf)

Program
Russian - Программа (5.3mb pdf)

Program
Mini (63kb pdf)

Conference Agenda
(81kb pdf)

Bibliography
(748k pdf)

Postcard
(320kb pdf)

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